FReedom

Religion has long brought valuable culture and values to daily life, and therefore it must not be muted or smothered, but given its rightful place as the backbone of society. Freedom of religion is the first of our liberties--not just freedom to worship, but to be protected in conducting life conscientiously by religiously informed rules and beliefs. Too many laws have been passed and court decisions made which frame religion as opposed to freedom rather than vital to ensuring it. CURE opposes government action which limits any citizen’s free exercise of religion or equal protection of the laws as guaranteed by the First and Fourteenth Amendments of the Constitution.
Marriage was a religious institution far before it became a civil practice. We must renew appreciation for marriage as squarely directed toward the establishment and support of family devoted to raising natural offspring, for through this the values of social coherence may be best transmitted. No civil provisions for marriage should in any way direct the principles and practices of religiously founded marriage rites; in fact, the civil recognition of such religious rights may not operate so as to govern them, it being a matter of discretion with civil authority whether to acknowledge them for merely civil purposes. What civil authority may and ought to appropriately acknowledge is that family is the key institution through which personal responsibility is transmitted, and thus a crucial pillar of society. As a matter of public policy, CURE deplores the redefinition of marriage in America as a social and cultural disaster. While such misunderstanding holds sway, we urge, as a matter of religious obligation, all clergy to preach the vital importance of traditional marriage.